The Value of Starbucks?

Hey. Come here. Pull up a chair. Don’t worry about it scraping across the floor—they already need to be refinished, but that won’t happen for a while. It’s okay if you get close, unless of course, you had onions or some other nasty smelling food that stinks up your breath. If that’s the case, here’s a Mentos, now come in and sit down. Trust me, you want to sit down. I have no clue how long this will take.

Today, I want to talk about something that is akin to churches asking for bigger offerings when they pass the plate. I’m saying I’m not sure how this blog will go over.

Recently, a friend of mine went on a rant about how people complain about the costs of books—especially eBooks—these days. What makes this interesting is I had a conversation with another friend about something similar. Instead of complaining about the costs of eBooks, we discussed what all it takes and how much time goes into creating a book (it doesn’t matter if it is an e-book or a print book, though print does take a little longer, the concept is the same).

I think I may have to break this up into sections so I can stay focused. Are you comfortable? Do you need a different seat? A cup of coffee? (That’s an appropriate question, considering the example I’m going to use.) Do you need to run to the bathroom before we get started? Go take care of all of that, and then come back. In the meantime, I’m going to get started.

Exhibit A: A Cup of Coffee, Anyone?

I love coffee. So does my wife. However, I only drink coffee that I make at home in my trusty Mr. Coffee pot. My wife is a little different than I am on that respect. Yes, she drinks the coffee I make in Mr. Coffee, but she also likes Starbucks. Personally, I don’t care much for the burnt coffee taste that is so strong it can put hair on your tongue.

Sure, they have their seven hundred million combinations and you can get it frapped, capped, iced and hot. You can get expresso (whatever that is) and a double shot of your favorite flavor. You can get them Short, Tall, Grande, Venti, and Trenta. I find the sizes confusing. Short is kind of like a basic coffee size. Tall is really a small. Grande is medium, venti is large and Trenta is the horse trough size. I’m not even sure Trenta is a real word. I think they just made that one up to sound fancy. (Okay, fine. It is a real world. It is Italian for ‘thirty.’ Whatever.)

For the sake of this post, I am going to stick with what Cate gets: a Grande vanilla latte with extra vanilla. I asked her a series of questions about her Starbucks experience. Here they are:

How long do you stand in line, on average before ordering? Two-three minutes.

How long do you wait after ordering? Five minutes, unless it is a busy day, then it could be up to ten minutes.

How much do you pay, on average? Between four and five dollars, if it is just me.

How long does it take you to drink it? If it is a hot drink, fifteen minutes, because I don’t want it to get cold. If it is an iced coffee, half an hour.

Thank you, Babe. I appreciate your time.

So, let me do a little math, and I am going to use the high end of the numbers Cate gave me: 3 + 10 + 30 + 20 (for the heck of it) = 63 minutes or just over an hour from the time she orders her drink until the time she is finished with it (if it’s an iced coffee).

Keep that number in mind.

Exhibit B: Putting Out a Book

For this part of the post, I am going to use the discussion I had with my friend about the amount of time it takes to put a book together, from beginning to end. Unlike with the Starbucks coffee exhibit, in this case, I will use more conservative numbers. I am also going to use my latest release, A Stitch of Madness as the example.

Are you ready for this? Here we go. (Don’t adjust your screen—there is nothing wrong with the formatting of this section.)

The stories in ASOM were written over a period of years. Let’s just say each story took 5 hours to write (yes, that is very conservative).

Then it took 5 hours to edit each one.

That is now 30 hours of working time on the stories.

I rewrote all three of the stories, and the rewrites took longer than the actual writing.

Let’s just say 7 hours went into each rewrite

Catherine’s Well was rewritten on four separate occasions. That’s 28 more hours just on that story.

So that is a total of 58 hours so far.

Stitches was rewritten twice.

Up to 72 hours.

A Sickly Sweet Scent was rewritten six times with three different endings (that is a total of 42 hours on those alone).

That is 114 hours.

Then there was the whole finding a publisher thing.

Thankfully, in this case it only took about 6 actual hours of researching and shopping it out. Stitched Smile Publications picked it up immediately.

120 hours so far.

That is three full work weeks.

But wait, I went back and edited the stories again after it was picked up. Why did I do that? I wanted it to be as good as I could make it before their editors went through it. That took about 18 hours.

Up to 138.

Then I formatted the book, reformatted it because the page numbers didn’t come out right in the print edition.

That took about 6 hours.

Now we are up to 144 hours.

Then I formatted it for the digital versions.

Fortunately, I had already formatted it for the print edition and only needed to change the TOC.

Add another 4 to it.

That is now 148 hours.

Now, you may be asking yourself, ‘Why did he do the formatting? Isn’t that the publisher’s job?’ Sure, it is, but SSP allowed me to be very hands on with the things I wanted to be hands on with, and hands off on the things I’m not all that good with. I believe a publisher and its authors should work together and help each other.

Then came all of the promoting and talking back and forth to the publishers, the contracts, all of the time it took to get the book out there. That’s an ongoing process, so let’s just cap it off at 12 hours.

That is 160 hours of work, and that is being conservative.

I got paid exactly ZERO dollars for around 160 hours of work. That is four full work weeks at forty hours a week. Remember, that is the conservative totals, and I left out several steps to boot.

Exhibit C: Minimum Wage and the Cost of a Book

The average for minimum wage in the United States is between seven and eight dollars. For this, we are going to split the difference and call it: $7.50. Now, let us do some simple math: 160 hours multiplied by $7.50 = $1200. If I got paid minimum wage as a writer, that would be the amount of money I would have made over that four work week period.

Now, let’s say the cost of an e-book is $2.99, but let us go ahead and round it up to a cool $3.00. In order to make minimum wage for one hour of work on A Stitch of Madness, I would have to sell two and a half eBooks.

Remember that 160 hours? Multiply that by 2.5. That is a total of 400 eBooks that would need to be sold (this is not including taxes or any other deductible) in order for me to make minimum wage writing a book based on the 160 work hours that went into it. Now, I don’t know what my sales numbers are right now, but I’m almost positive it isn’t 400 books worth.

One more thing to keep in mind here: that four work weeks of time is done an hour here, three hours there, two hours here and so on. It’s not like a writer with a full time job can sit for six or seven or ten hours a day and work on the books. It is a commitment.

Exhibit D: Back to Starbucks We Go

Let’s go back to Starbucks for a minute. Remember my wife? Remember how much time she said she spent from the time she got in line at the Starbucks until the time she finished her Grande Vanilla Latte? That’s right, one hour. And remember how much she said she spends each time she gets one? Between four and five dollars. Again, we will split the difference and base it on the 160 hours mentioned above.

Time for math again: 160 X 4.50 = $720.

Even if we only counted the cost of a coffee at Starbucks it would take one and a half eBooks to buy one Grande Vanilla Latte. It would take 240 books to buy 160 Starbucks coffees. Crazy, I know. Why would anyone want to buy coffee at Starbucks 160 times?

Exhibit E: Value

I’ve stated on numerous occasions over the last few years that people value things differently. By value, I mean, how much would you pay for something you want? I’ll give you a couple of examples:

I don’t like steak. Yeah, I know. Who doesn’t like steak? Umm…me. Since I don’t like steak I am not going to spend $15.00 at a steakhouse for one. I don’t care if they come with baked potatoes on the side—a baked potato is worth only so much. A steak holds very little value to me.

Many folks value their Starbucks coffee and will spend more than that five bucks my wife spends on it. They value that coffee and are willing to pay what I consider too much for it.

Each person values things at a different level and different price. I hope that makes as much sense to you as it does in my head.

Exhibit F: Devaluing Art

Art is subjective. Everyone has an opinion about it. I don’t care much for Taylor Swift songs. I just don’t. Are they good? Sure they are. Are they my cup of tea? No. Would I listen to them on an everyday basis or throw one of her albums on and listen to them on the trusty headset? No. That doesn’t mean her songs are not art.

I have a friend who paints and draws some of the most amazing images. He sells them. Recently, he had been commissioned to do a painting for someone. They agreed on the price. He got to work, finished the picture and let the guy know. Before the customer even looked at the painting, he wanted my friend to lower the price. This did not sit well with my friend, and an argument ensued.

‘I can order similar pictures online for half the price.’

My friend ended up not selling the piece. His work was devalued by the customer because of what he could get online. Sad but true.

That brings us to eBooks. Are they real books? Yes, yes they are. It takes a lot of work to put out any book, eBooks included. Is it something you can hold in your hands? Is it tangible? Yes, yes it is, though maybe not as tangible as a paper book where you have to flip the page to turn it (and not just swipe a screen with your finger), or dog ear or use a bookmark so you don’t lose the page you are on when you close the book.

The problem? ‘It’s an eBook. It shouldn’t be so expensive.’ Answer me this: why not? Why should we charge less for the same amount of work? You wouldn’t take a job making less than someone else doing the exact same job would you? So, why charge less than what a book is worth?

‘It’s not a print book, so there is no paper involved.’

True. So why not cut the price by twenty percent instead of seventy to eighty? Most paperbacks these days cost around ten to fifteen dollars, but let’s use the lower end of that for now. If I sell one paperback for $10.00 (which is still cheap) I would have to sell three eBooks and still not make the same amount of money as I did the print version.

The same amount of work went into creating the book—the art, if you will—but one version of it is discounted significantly, partially because it is not paper.

Exhibit G: Authors Do Not Rake in the Dough

I probably shouldn’t do this, but do you remember that $3.00 price tag for an eBook? Let’s just say you purchased it for your Kindle. Well, the author doesn’t make three bucks. Nope, the author only makes a percentage of that. There are two basic royalty amounts on Amazon: 35% and 70%.

If an eBook is purchased at $3.00 and the royalty is set for 70%, the author makes $2.10. Selling two eBooks at that price won’t even get you one Starbucks coffee. Take that same price at 35%. That comes to a whopping…$1.05. That would be the amount of money an author makes per eBook sold.

Want a little perspective? It would take selling 7 eBooks at $3.00 with a 35% royalty rate in order to make the average minimum wage in the United States.

But why 35%, you ask? Well, there is this thing call KDP Select. If you enroll your title into KDP Select you can get that 70% royalty, but your book also gets added to the Kindle Free Lending Library, which means the author isn’t making 70% if it is ‘borrowed’.

Exhibit H: Let’s Put This All Together Now

Let me go ahead and state this: Not everyone will agree with me on this blog post. Some may even be argumentative about this. Are the numbers accurate for everyone? No. They are numbers based on my experience and royalties I have received on sells of my books.

Here is where the rubber meets the road. Most authors write because they enjoy it. Yes, we want to make money. If we didn’t then many of us would stick to writing and our stories would never see the light of day. Why? Because it takes so much time to do all of the other stuff involved that is not writing in order to get the work published.

Writers like to entertain people. Writing is difficult, just as most art forms are. It may be easy for some, but not for most. Sometimes it is agonizing.

I’ve said all of the stuff above to kind of paint a picture of a writer’s life who has a full time job (not one who can afford to write for a living). It takes hours and hours of hard work and commitment to complete a book and get it ready for publishing. I left out all the stuff about rejections from editors and agents and publishers. I left out all the criticism writers face. I left out a lot of stuff on purpose—it just didn’t fit what I was going for.

Here is what I won’t leave out: You, the reader, can make a difference in a writer’s life. You can.

‘How?’ you ask? Great question. Here is how: Buy their work. Don’t get it for free through Amazon Prime (yes, I know you pay for the service, but it doesn’t help the writers you like). Read the book. Review the book (this is a very important step, but that is a topic for later). Let other folks know about it through social media or by mouth. Like their author pages, both on Facebook and Amazon (if they have one). Subscribe to their blogs and newsletters (you will get to know more about your favorite authors that way). If you can, drop them a line and let them know you enjoy their work. Those little notes are great ego boosters. When you can, purchase the print books. If you can get them directly from the author, do that (and if it is in your heart, pay more than what they are selling it for. By doing this, you are placing a value on their work, and that is as important for the writer as most anything else you can do). If you ask, they will probably sign the book for you.

And don’t complain about the price of the book. When you break it all down, writers make very little money on hours and hours of work.

Exhibit I: One More Thing And, Yeah, It Is Important

I will never put my books up for free on Amazon. I won’t. I don’t understand the concept of it. Don’t get me wrong, I do understand the concept of giving work away in order to get new readers. I do that each month with The Brown Bag Stories. But, as I stated above, with authors making so very little money off of eBooks priced at $3.00 a piece, then why give it away at even less than the marginal amount we do make?

KDP Select allows for five days throughout the term of the book’s enrollment into the program where the author or publisher can make the book free to purchase. Free to purchase isn’t purchasing. To purchase something you have to spend something on it in return. If no money is spent, then there is no purchase made. Sure, there are downloads to be had, but I have a problem with giving books away for free on Amazon.

Would you like to know why? Sure you would.

A lot of people will download a book for free and never read it. They see it’s free and download it, just in case they decide they want to read it. Does it help a writer’s numbers? Not really. Sure, your numbers will jump and your rank will increase, but if everyone who downloads the book for free were interested in it in the first place, maybe they should have paid for it.

Here’s the other thing, and this is going to come across as harsh, but this is my opinion: if someone who wasn’t willing to spend $3.00 on your book downloads it for free, the value of your book–your hard work–is $0.00 to them. Let that sink in for a minute. Basically, that is saying all of your time and energy and care, all of the love you put into creating the best possible book you can has a net value of zero dollars.

Also, if one thousand people download it, you still make nothing, and there goes the potential of a thousand customers. So remember, 70% of zero is still zero.

Here’s another way of looking at it: Would you work a job for 160 hours for free? Before you answer this question, think about it. Would you go to a job and work at that job for forty hours a week for four weeks knowing you would get no compensation for your time and energy? I bet the majority of people will say ‘no.’ If you wouldn’t work a job for free, please, don’t make your favorite writers do the same thing.

In Conclusion

 I’ve wrestled with this topic for a while now. Some people probably won’t care much for it. Some people may even say I’m just screaming for attention. Call it what you want. Like I said at the beginning, this might be viewed the same as being asked to pay tithes at your local Baptist, Methodist, Pentecostal, Catholic, and a whole slew of other churches. It might be unpopular.

I know a lot of really good writers, most of whom you have probably never heard of, all of whom are passionate about their work. You may not even know who I am. You may have stumbled upon this blog or had someone share it with you and you have never heard of A.J. Brown. That’s okay. It is what it is and it ain’t what it ain’t.

This business is hard. Finding readers is difficult. Finding readers who become fans is even more difficult. Making money? Yeah, that’s a luxury most of us don’t have (myself included). Making a living at this? That isn’t even close to a luxury.

If you have stumbled across someone whose work you enjoy, let them know. Spread the word about their books, leave reviews for them, purchase their work. I’m not talking about myself here (unless, of course, I am your favorite writer). I’m talking about all of us who do this with a passion and a heart for writing.

For now, I’m going to go switch on Mr. Coffee and do a little writing. These stories aren’t going to write themselves. I’m on the clock, now. Until we meet again my friends, be kind to one another.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book Pricing and Value

Good day Faithful Readers. I would like to take a moment or two to address something that, as a writer, is important to me. Pricing of books. Uh oh. Did I just get a collective groan and roll of the eyes? Hold on. Hold on. Stick with me for a few minutes. The reason I want to talk about book pricing is because it is a hot button for a lot of readers, writers and publishers. The other reason is because of a video I watched back in December of an author who wanted to respond to what I took as a mean-spirited e-mail directed at her. Her response held all of the true emotions I think anyone would go through after reading such an e-mail. However, she doesn’t show any anger, an emotion I thought would have been justified.

The e-mail was a direct result of the Person in Question (PIQ from here on out) having to spend $4.99 on an e-book. Personally, I don’t think that is high, not for a novel and certainly not for one that the PIQ said was quite possibly the best thing that author had ever written. There are two things I really want to touch on about this particular subject based on the video response of the author.

The first is based on a statement in the e-mail:

…While the books are beautifully written, I don’t get why you have to charge so much for your books. It doesn’t take that much to write a book these days or publish it. Everyone is doing it…

I completely disagree with this statement, especially the ‘it doesn’t take much to write a book these days’ portion. And here is why: there is one component to writing a book that every author must have in order to do so. That is time. Without time there is no book. Without taking that time and placing your butt in a chair for hours on end there is no book. Without taking that time and researching the subject matter there is no book. Without taking that time and figuring out which direction to go with the storyline or which characters you really want to develop there is no story. Without taking that time to find an editor and a cover artist and beta readers and proofreaders and then doing all the edits there is no book. Without taking that time to format the book, preview it, reformat it, preview it again, the book is shoddy at best. Without taking that time and doing all the marketing and promotional work people don’t know about the book.

Here’s the thing about time: you never get it back. You never get the time invested into the book back. You never get the time away from your family and friends back. You never get the hours and hours back. I’m a firm believer in time is the greatest asset a person has, and for writers, they just don’t seem to ever have enough of it. There is no hourly wage for writers when it comes to the amount of time they spend writing, editing, and promoting books.

The other thing about that particular statement I disagree with is it doesn’t take a lot to write a book. For authors, it is not just about writing a book, but telling a story. For me, if I write a story and by the end of it, I think it sucks, well guess who never gets to read it: you, the readers. If it sucks, it sucks. That’s the bottom line. If I struggle to write a story, then I know you will struggle to read it, so it stays on my computer and never sees the light of day.

Good writers look at their work as an art form. For them, it is important that the story is pleasing to the mind. Just like a painter or a sculptor wants to wow people with visual beauty, and just like a musician wants the listeners to truly enjoy what they hear, good writers want their words to engage the readers, to be enjoyable to the readers, to be pleasing to the readers.

However, there are those out there who jot down a few words, create a cover and do no edits and throw them online for sale. They, well, they make things more difficult for the ones who put in real time and effort to bring you, the readers, an enjoyable experience. They must be the ones the PIQ refers to when she/he said, ‘everyone is doing it.’

This leads me to the second point, which is also something the PIQ said in his/her e-mail: the PIQ read the book, said it was great and then returned it because the PIQ didn’t feel he/she should have to pay $4.99 for an e-book. Let me see if I got this straight: The PIQ purchased the book. The PIQ read the book. The PIQ then returned the book after coming to the conclusion that the book was the best thing the author had ever written. It sounds to me like the PIQ quite possibly enjoyed the book.

Honestly, and maybe this is just me here, but this strikes me as very close to stealing. He/she read the book and then demanded his/her money back, not because the product wasn’t good, but because she/he felt it was overpriced. Yeah, I know there is such a thing as buyer’s remorse, but this isn’t the case. If the PIQ didn’t like the price of the book, maybe he/she shouldn’t have bought it. You’re not going to go to Barnes and Nobel or Books A Million, buy a book, read it and then take it back. You’re not going to go to a restaurant, order a meal, eat it and then refuse to pay for it, even though it was the best meal you’ve ever eaten. The PIQ essentially received the product for free by returning it.

How is that right? How is that even allowed?

You bought it. You read it. You enjoyed it. You keep it.

Dear Faithful Readers, I would never want you to be dissatisfied with one of my books, but is it fair to get the product, enjoy the product and then not pay for it? If you did that in the restaurant I mentioned above you would be arrested and carted off to jail. How in the world is this allowed?

This bothers me. It doesn’t anger me so much as it saddens me. The reader admittedly enjoyed the book. That’s what I keep going back to. If the PIQ enjoyed it, why would it not be worth the 4.99 price tag?

And another thing: writers don’t make that much money off a sale. So having the book returned, even though it was the best thing the author had ever written…that stings. And it’s wrong. There are no two sides of this coin. Sure, someone out there will play devil’s advocate and argue for the reader, but go back to what the PIQ said, and any argument that can be made would be invalid.

Writers don’t price books high, we price them low. The big publishers, they price books high. But us little guys and gals, we don’t. We price them low for two reasons: 1) We are mostly unknown and want readers to purchase our books and read them. (Though this is the case for many of us, and yes, we want readers, I will not give my books away for free. Free sales are not sales and many folks who get the books for free don’t read them, and even fewer leave reviews about them or tell folks about them.) And, 2) Writers understand the value of both money and time. We try to give you a good value for your hard earned dollar and we try to make sure we don’t waste your time by putting out garbage.

Sure, writing is easy. It’s as simple as putting one word after another. However, forming coherent sentences that make sense, and creating a story out of those coherent sentences is not as easy as some believe. Sure, anyone can write ‘See Spot Run,’ but telling us what Spot looks like, where he is running and why he is running is an entirely different thing…and much harder.

There is a component to everything people spend their money on. It is Value. What may be too high at 4.99 for some, isn’t high enough for others. For a writer, musician, painter, sculptor, singer and so on, we value our work much higher than what we sell it for. But we know, in order to get it into customers’ hands, we have to sell it low.

It’s all in how much you value something. I’m not a fan of porterhouse steaks, so guess what I won’t pay a lot of money for? I do, however, value a good book and will pay a little more for one of those than I would a porterhouse steak.

Let me put it another way: Do you like Starbucks coffee? Or any coffee that you buy from anywhere, for that matter? What does that generally run you? Four dollars? Five? Six? If you like that particular coffee, then there is a good chance you are going to buy it at somewhere between four and six or seven dollars. How long does it take to make that coffee? Two minutes? Four minutes? Let’s just say five minutes. How long does it take to drink that coffee? Ten minutes? Twenty Minutes? Let’s just say it takes forty minutes to drink a cup of coffee that took five minutes to make that you spent five bucks on.

How about a little perspective from a writer’s point of view? I began working on my novel, Cory’s Way, in 2008. It was released on Amazon in December of 2014 for the same amount of money ($4.99) as the young lady’s book who was told in an e-mail that someone returned her book because it was too expensive (even though she enjoyed it and thought it was the best work the writer had ever done, and that it was beautifully written, no less). What took me six years to put out cost the same price as a cup of coffee that takes five minutes to make and forty minutes to drink. A twelve ounce drink is worth $4.99, but an e-book is not? I guess it really is in how and what people value.

Let me say this last thing: If you buy a book and read it, please keep it. It’s only fair and it’s the right thing to do. As a writer, I work hard to offer you the best I can give you. Most of us do. Honestly, and again, this may be me, but when the PIQ returned the book because he/she thought it was too much, though enjoyable and the best thing that writer had ever written, he/she belittled the value of the book to the writer. Yes, I used the word belittled. Some may disagree, but that’s okay. This is how I feel. Let me tell you, the value of that book to that writer is so much more than $4.99, but the sting of having to give that little bit of money back after the book was read and loved…that just hurts…and it’s wrong. There are no two ways about this. It was wrong.

You bought it. You read it. You loved it. You keep it.

Thank you for coming by today, and I hope I didn’t bore you too much with this particular blog. Until we meet again, my friends, be kind to one another…

 

 

The Value of It All

I was going to work on a few things today, but some other things have gotten in the way of that. I have some writing that needs to get done. I also have the last two chapters of the first draft of a friend’s novel that I am itching to edit and get back to her (I love what she has done, but that’s for a later discussion). However, I want to focus on something else in this particular post.

Recently, a friend of mine sent me a link to a website called The Minimalists. Now, before you check out the website, which I hope you do, understand that some of the thoughts on there aren’t for everyone. Some of them aren’t even for me. However, there are some great posts, including the one I am going to write on today.

If you were to click that link above, you would end up looking at the very post that I want to talk about today—or at least, something in that post that I want to talk about. To set it up for you, this is part of an interview of Joshua Fields Millburn, a writer and one of the gentlemen who created the website, The Minimalists. Mr. Millburn responds to a question as follows, and I quote:

I am a writing evangelist. I self-publish because it’s currently the best option for me and for my readers. I wouldn’t sign with a publisher just for the sake of being “a published author,” which by itself is an empty endeavor that reeks of pretense.

That said, I’m not allergic to money either. There is nothing wrong with signing with a publisher, and I’d be happy to ink a book deal if it made good financial sense. A publisher can be a great partner for an author, they can help authors in several ways. I’m not, however, going to lose any sleep if the publishers don’t come knocking my door down with bags of cash. As long as I continue to add value, my audience will support my work with or without a publisher.

A few things: First, I love that term, writing evangelist. What a way to look at it. If you view that the same as a Christian evangelist, then Mr. Millburn is working really hard to reach the readers out there, and isn’t that what we’re supposed to do? Reach the readers?

Second, which I think is something I have never heard a writer say before: I wouldn’t sign with a publisher just for the sake of being “a published author,” which by itself is an empty endeavor that reeks of pretense.

Holy cow. Brilliant.

Hey, you writers out there, did you get that?

I can’t tell you how many times I have heard writers say ‘I want to be a published writer.’ Yes, I want to be one as well, but is it the most important thing in the world? I don’t believe so. After thinking about this for a while today, it’s not all about how much money you can make. Oh no, it’s not. And to be able to say ‘I’m a published writer’ might stroke the ego a bit (and in some cases, far too much), but I’m not so certain it validates anything.

The last part of the quote is the most important:

As long as I continue to add value, my audience will support my work with or without a publisher.

There’s one of the keys to writing. The Value of it. I’ve often looked at my writing as something I enjoy doing, but something I also want readers to enjoy. I’ve also thought if someone spends money on one of my stories, books or whatever, then I have to make sure and give them the best value I can for their hard earned money. If the readers feel like they have received a good story or stories for their money, then what are the chances they will come back for more?

If we add value to our words, the readers will follow, regardless of whether we are published by a big publishing house or if we self publish our work.

As writers, we should make sure there is value to our work—and not the value as we see it. How we view our stories may greatly differ from what the reader thinks (notice I didn’t say what the editor thinks—it is all about the reader, not the editor—sorry my editor friends). We can’t be so enamored with our literary brilliance that we forget it’s not about us. No, it never is. It’s about the story and if we remember to keep it about the story, then the reader will always find value in our work. And they will come back for more.

In the end, that’s all that really matters. Book deals are nice. Making money is nice. I would love both of those, but above all else, I want my readers to enjoy the story, for them to find a value or a worth in the words I write.

Adding value to your writing? It’s a novel concept and one that I have been striving for.

As always, thank you for reading, because without you, all of us writers would be writing to a nonexistent audience.

Until we meet again, my friends…